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Media Summary August 21Media Summary August 21The HIM Media Summary is compiled by the HIM Communications’ team on a bi-weekly basis. The stories featured in this email include topics related to Health Information Management. <h3 class="phsa-rteElement-Header3">HEALTH CARE NEWS & POLICY</h3><p class="phsa-rteElement-Paragraph"><br><a href="http://nationalpost.com/health/how-much-does-the-average-canadian-pay-for-public-health/wcm/02a19155-bba4-4431-bba9-3702f32e027d" target="_blank" name="nationalpost health how much does the average">How much does the 'average' Canadian pay in a year for public health care?</a><br>National Post | August 2, 2017<br><br>The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) believes Canada spent approximately $228 billion on health care in 2016. That’s 11.1 per cent of Canada’s entire GDP and $6,299 for every Canadian resident.<br><br>That per capita rate would put Canada near the high end of what other advanced economies pay.<br><br>According to the CIHI, in 2014, the last year for which comparable data was available, Canada spent $5,543 per resident, more than the United Kingdom ($4,986) and Australia ($5,187) but less than Sweden ($6,245) and far less than the United States ($11,126).<br><br><a href="https://www.cantechletter.com/newswire/reliq-health-technologies-announces-go-live-with-rio-grande-valley-health-alliance-mcallen-tx-20mm-usd-in-annual-recurring-revenue-at-full-deployment/" target="_blank" name="https cantechletter newswire reliq health t">Reliq Health Technologies Announces Go-Live with Rio Grande Valley Health Alliance</a><br>CanTech Letter | Aug 17, 2017<br><br>VANCOUVER, British Columbia, Aug. 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Reliq Health Technologies Inc.(TSXV:RHT) (OTCQB:RQHTF) (“Reliq” or the “Company”), a technology company focused on developing innovative mobile health (mHealth) and telemedicine solutions for Community-Based Healthcare, is pleased to announce the go-live of remote patient monitoring, care coordination and telemedicine platform with their Rio Grande Valley Health Alliance, LLC (RGVHA) in McAllen, Texas. <br><br>The Company has begun enrolling the first of RGVHA’s >30,000 Primary Care patients. The Company expects to add >500 patients to the platform each month going forward, generating over $20 Million USD in recurring annual revenue at full deployment.<br><br><a href="http://phcnews.ca/news/desktop-transformation-project-dtp-well-its-way" target="_blank" name="phcnews ca news desktop transformation projec">Desktop Transformation Project (Dtp) Well On Its Way</a><br>PHC News | Aug 14, 2017<br><br>To date, 13% of Providence Health Care’s 4500 Windows XP workstations have been replaced because our Patient Care Information System (SCM, ED, ES, AM) was not Windows7 compatible. We are happy to let you know that a solution has been developed and plans are underway to pilot in the following areas:<br><br>Preadmission Clinic (starting Aug 9)Inpatient Surgery 10AB (starting Aug 14)Inpatient Renal 6B (starting Aug 21)HIM Registration Standards and Data Quality (starting Aug 21)SPH Emergency (starting Aug 28)Palliative Care 10D (starting Sep 18)<br><br>These plans to replace our computers have provided the opportunity to ‘redesign the clinical desktop’ with the intent to provide a more optimized and user friendly desktop experience for our clinicians. Key stakeholders across PHC have been engaged throughout the redesign and the pilot planning process. The key approaches for introducing the new clinical desktop are:<br><br>No formal training required (quick reference guides at each workstation)A range of support models: Super users, Onsite ‘project’ support at shift change, 24/7 phone supportA range of implementation models piloted (gradual versus ‘all at once’ rollouts)Hybrid environment with new (Windows 7) and old (Windows XP) computers both being available as the new clinical desktop rolls out to all clinical areas of the organization. <br><br>The key criteria for the new clinical desktop is that the “user experience must be at the same or better level than current user experience.” The pilots will be assessed specifically as it relates to clinical workflow and systems performance and will be reported back to our Senior Leadership team by the end of September to inform the plan moving forward. <br><br>If the pilots are successful, we are moving forward with the development of the post pilot rollout plans. As a first step, DTP will conduct a full discovery (inventory) of the remaining workstations across PHC to determine the hardware and software that will be needed to support the replacement of each workstation. Some departments/units have already been contacted to start the discovery work. The new computers with preloaded programs will be rolled out starting mid/late October and targeting to complete in April 2018.<br><br><a href="http://www.canhealth.com/blog/it-and-ipac-collaborate-to-develop-an-app-to-improve-data-collection/" name="canhealth blog it and ipac collaborate to dev" target="_blank"></a><br><a href="http://vchnews.ca/across-vch/2017/08/16/changes-vch-senior-executive-team/#.WZsu1BXyuUm" target="_blank" name="vchnews ca across vch 2017 08 16 changes vch ">Changes to VCH Senior Executive Team</a><br>VCH News | Aug 16, 2017<br><br>With that in mind, it is with mixed emotions that I announce the departure of two members of the VCH Senior Executive Team. Oliver Grüter-Andrew, our Chief Information Officer, has accepted a new position as President and CEO of E-Comm 9-1-1, the organization responsible for the processing of BC’s 9-1-1 emergency calls and the response of police, fire and ambulance resources to them. Oliver, who provides oversight to our IMITS operations on a Lower Mainland basis through PHSA, first came to the executive table in 2015 and has made a significant impact on the delivery of IMITS services within VCH. While delighted for Oliver and the opportunity that lies ahead of him, I am disappointed that we will lose his leadership and experience in an area critical to the continued success of our health system. His last day with IMITS and VCH will be September 15. A decision on interim and future leadership for the IMITS function will be announced shortly.<br><br>Also leaving in the coming months is Paul Brownrigg, our Vice President of Clinical & Systems Transformation and Innovation. Paul joined us in 2014 to move our vision of transformation and innovation forward and he has done a wonderful job of advancing our strategies in areas ranging from telehealth and virtual care, to diagnostic imaging and CST. When Paul came to us, it was always on the basis of a term-position, meaning he would provide his services and expertise before choosing to move onto his next challenge. He feels the time is right to take that next step and will leave VCH in November to return to the world of healthcare consulting. A decision on the future leadership for Paul’s role will be made within the context of our overall transformational vision in the coming months.<br><br><a href="https://www.piquenewsmagazine.com/whistler/pemberton-health-centre-to-get-new-nurses-and-technology/Content?oid=3925374" target="_blank" name="https piquenewsmagazine whistler pemberton ">Pemberton Health Centre to get new nurses and technology</a><br>Pemberton Health Centre | July 27, 2017<br><br>Karin Olson, chief operating officer for Vancouver Coastal Health (VCH), visited the Village of Pemberton's (VOP) Committee of the Whole meeting on Tuesday, July 25 with some welcome news.<br><br>Olson informed council that VCH has hired five additional nurses to serve the corridor, and now Pemberton will have two on-call nurses on any given night.<br><br>Since a nurse went on leave after a disturbing incident at the Pemberton Medical Clinic, the community has been dealing with staffing shortages, particularly for on-call shifts.<br><br>Olson also said that the Pemberton Health Centre and the Whistler Health Care Centre will be the first two hospitals in VCH to join the Clinical and Systems Transformation Project, a new initiative that will digitize patient records, so that they can be easily shared across hospitals throughout the region, as well as with the Provincial Health Services Authority and Providence Health Care.<br><br>"It allows the care providers here to look back on their history and see what care was provided, avoiding duplication of tests but also making sure that allergies and other safety pieces are respected," explained Olson following her presentation.<br><br><a href="http://vchnews.ca/across-vch/2017/08/15/reminder-call-abstracts-bc-quality-forum-2018/#.WZs0xxXyuUl" target="_blank" name="vchnews ca across vch 2017 08 15 reminder cal">REMINDER: Call for abstracts for BC Quality Forum 2018</a><br>VCH News | August 15, 2017<br><br><a href="http://qualityforum.ca/" target="_blank" name="qualityforum ca ">The Quality Forum</a> is an annual event that brings together hundreds of people who are passionate about improving the quality of health care to learn, connect and share their work with each other. Presentations from participants are a central part of the Quality Forum – this is your chance to tell everyone about your big ideas, success stories and lessons learned from your work! Presentation abstracts for Quality Forum 2018 are due on September 8, 2017.<br></p><h3 class="phsa-rteElement-Header3">EHEALTH</h3><p class="phsa-rteElement-Paragraph"><br><a href="https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/07/29/doctors-use-this-software-during-patient-visits-now-big-pharma-is-tapping-it-to-sell-their-drugs.html" target="_blank" name="https thestar news canada 2017 07 29 doctor">Doctors use this software during patient visits. Now Big Pharma is tapping it to sell their drugs</a><br>Toronto Star | July 29, 2017<br><br>Electronic patient records in doctors’ offices across the country are being used by brand name drug companies looking to muscle market share away from generic competitors, a Star investigation has found.<br><br>Concerned physicians say a clinical tool they use to write prescriptions and care for patients is being co-opted, and they fear health records are being tapped so drug companies can increase profits.<br><br>In the battle for pharmaceutical dominance, this new tactic, deployed in software used by doctors, has allowed brand-name companies to capitalize on the moment a prescription is written.<br><br>Here’s how it works:<br><br>The patient records are found in EMRs, or electronic medical record software, owned by Telus Health, a subsidiary of the telecom giant. The software is used by thousands of Canadian doctors to take notes during patient visits and to create a prescription to be filled by the patient’s pharmacy.<br><br>To drive business their way, brand-name drug companies have paid Telus to digitally insert vouchers so that the prescription is filled with their product instead of the lower-cost generic competitor that pharmacists normally reach for.<br><br>The vouchers are known in the industry as “patient-assistance programs.” It works like a coupon: If a patient’s insurance does not cover the full cost of the pricier brand name drug, the drug’s manufacturer will cover part or all of the cost difference from its generic equivalent.<br><br>The voucher feature is offered in a number of other electronic medical record systems, Telus said.<br></p><h3 class="phsa-rteElement-Header3">PRIVACY<br></h3><p class="phsa-rteElement-Paragraph"><br><a href="http://www.hrmonline.ca/hr-business-review/employment-litigation-and-advice/privacybreaching-worker-wins-reinstatement-229136.aspx" target="_blank" name="hrmonline ca hr business review employment li">Privacy-breaching worker wins reinstatement</a><br>Human Resources News Canada | August 8, 2017</p><p class="phsa-rteElement-Paragraph"><br>Privacy issues in employment are gaining more and more attention these days, particularly in the healthcare sector.<br><br>The importance of privacy for individuals, institutions, and government is reflected in increasing restrictions and regulations on access to information.<br><br>For example, in late June 2017, the Ontario Government filed O.Reg 224/17 which amends the General Regulation under the Personal Health Information Protection Act to increase the situations when a health care custodian must notify the Information Privacy Commissioner of a possible breach.<br><br>Despite the increasing legislative scrutiny, enforcement and adherence to privacy restrictions remains a challenge for employers. Employers who are healthcare custodians are increasingly required to make discipline decisions with respect to employees who breach privacy and often those breaches occur out of simple curiosity.<br><br>Curiosity may have killed the cat, but arbitral case law suggests that curiosity by unionized employees may not kill the employment relationship.<br><br>In order to uphold the termination of employment for a unionized employee, an arbitrator must be satisfied that not only was there cause for discipline but that the penalty of discharge is appropriate in all the circumstances.<br><br>Unfortunately for employers trying to uphold their obligations as health care custodians and protectors of privacy, the approach taken by arbitrators might mean that a zero tolerance policy on privacy breaches will be ineffective. Arbitrators regularly look to factors such as remorse, reasons for the breach, and economic hardship to determine if the discharge should be upheld.<br><br>A recent decision from British Columbia, which was upheld on <a href="http://www.lrb.bc.ca/decisions/B062$2017.pdf" name="lrb bc ca decisions B062 2017 pdf">review</a><a href="http://www.lrb.bc.ca/decisions/B062$2017.pdf" name="lrb bc ca decisions B062 2017 pdf 2">,</a> suggests that even if the employee fails to show remorse until the day of the arbitration hearing, this belated remorse may be sufficient to allow an arbitrator to conclude that the employment relationship can be repaired and that reinstatement is appropriate.<br><br>In this case, a nurse had been terminated from her employment after improperly accessing personal medical records of numerous patients out of curiosity.<br><br>The union grieved the termination and a hearing was held where the union successfully argued that termination was an inappropriate and excessive penalty. The nurse was reinstated, although without back pay, despite the emphasis on privacy by governments and patients.<br><br>Arbitrator Brown ordered reinstatement in part because the nurse was discipline-free over eight years, the termination made it difficult to find alternate employment, the nurse was remorseful, and the nurse had taken courses to educate herself on privacy.<br><br><a href="http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/july-2017/privacy-rights-nafta-agenda/" target="_blank" name="policyoptions irpp org magazines july 2017 pr">Will the new NAFTA allow Canadian governments to ensure that private data collected from Canadians will not be stored outside this country?</a><br>Policy Options| July 28, 2017<br><br>As we get ready to enter what promises to be a very contentious renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), we should keep in mind that supply-managed milk and chickens are not the only things the Americans will want to have on the table. The list of items for negotiation includes a number of sectors that were not included in the original agreement, often because those industries did not exist in the mid-1990s, at least not on the scale they do now.<br><br>In fact, the United States has <a href="https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/files/Press/Releases/NAFTAObjectives.pdf" name="https ustr gov sites default files files Pr">made it explicit</a> that it intends to “establish rules to ensure that NAFTA countries do not impose measures that restrict cross-border data flows and do not require the use or installation of local computing facilities.” British Columbia’s public sector privacy law does just that, and we can expect that the domestic data-storage requirement in its Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA) will be a bone of contention.<br><br>And no, this intention of the Americans’ isn’t some new zaniness from the mind of President Donald Trump, but a long-standing claim by <a href="http://www.ustr.gov/sites/default/files/2013%20NTE.pdf" name="ustr gov sites default files 2013 20NTE pdf">successive administrations</a>.<br><br>BC is one of two provinces in Canada that have a domestic data storage requirement in law (the other is Nova Scotia). In BC the law came about as a way out of a huge controversy during the first government of Liberal premier Gordon Campbell. In 2004, Campbell undertook a number of outsourcing initiatives, one of which involved the health ministry contracting out the administration of BC’s public health insurance program to Maximus, a US-controlled private service provider.<br><br>The centre of the controversy was the prospect of the application of the USA Patriot Act to British Columbians’ personal health information. The USA Patriot Act contained a number of measures allowing American security and law enforcement agencies to gain access to personal information. This caused a huge uproar in BC.<br><a href="https://www.oipc.bc.ca/special-reports/1271" name="https oipc bc ca special reports 1271"><br>BC’s information and privacy commissioner</a> demanded that protections be brought in, requiring that this data be stored in Canada (among other things), and Campbell agreed. As a result, <a href="http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/96165_03#section30.1" name="bclaws ca EPLibraries bclaws_new document ID ">BC’s law</a> requires public bodies in the province to “ensure that personal information in its custody or under its control is stored only in Canada and accessed only in Canada,” subject to a few limited exceptions.<br><br>The BC and Nova Scotia laws have been targeted by the Office of the US Trade Representative (USTR). In <a href="https://t.co/u1DGqv6wd4" name="https t co u1DGqv6wd4">the latest annual report</a> on what it considers to be trade barriers around the world, the USTR claims these laws are barriers to digital trade:<br><br>British Columbia and Nova Scotia each have laws that mandate that personal information in the custody of a public body must be stored and accessed only in Canada unless one of a few limited exceptions applies. These laws prevent public bodies, such as primary and secondary schools, universities, hospitals, government-owned utilities, and public agencies, from using U.S. services when there is a possibility that personal information would be stored in or accessed from the United States.<br><br>Internal <a href="http://fipa.bc.ca/library/Released_through_FOI/USTR%20TPP.pdf" name="fipa bc ca library Released_through_FOI USTR ">USTR documents</a> we obtained through the American Freedom of Information Act show that major US companies (Rackspace/Salesforce) complained to the USTR about BC’s requirement that government and other public sector data be stored in Canada. The documents also show the USTR took those complaints seriously, and it made a point of calling the BC ministry responsible for the law in early 2012 to discuss the issue. We didn’t get a record of what precisely was said during the call, but the USTR officials’ e-mails we did receive indicated they were interested in what they heard from the BC Ministry of Citizens’ Services.<br><br><a href="http://www.fortherecordmag.com/archives/0817p18.shtml" target="_blank" name="fortherecordmag archives 0817p18 shtml">Swift Response Can Limit Cyber Attack Damage</a><br>For the Record | August 2017<br><br>On an organizational level, response plans provide the foundation for an effective defense and mitigation strategy. Sharecare's Jim Bailey, president of the company's health data services business unit, says that although organizations of every size and industry are under a constant barrage of cyber attacks, "In the event that one of these is successful at breaching your defenses, a cyber response plan, or incident response plan as we call it, can drastically impact the outcome of the attack. The complexity of systems, networks, and applications can be difficult and time consuming to properly inspect and recover from a cyber incident."<br><br>Time is definitely not on a health care organization's side when a cyber incident presents itself, says Sandy Garfinkel, JD, founder and chair of the Data Security and Privacy Practice Group at the law firm Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott. "Breach response is a game that is played against the clock. The longer it takes to investigate the incident, round up response team members and decision makers, identify affected people, marshal resources, and create and issue notifications, the greater the exposure to an entity," he explains, adding that exposure comes from many directions, including private claims, regulatory investigations, and shareholder actions.<br><br>Therefore, readiness is critical to minimizing fallout, says Rita Bowen, MA, RHIA, CHPS, CHPC, SSGB, vice president of privacy, compliance, and HIM policy with MRO, a disclosure management firm, adding that health care organizations must be vigilant and proactive in their efforts through incident response teams. "At MRO, we have a privacy and security incident response team and a data protection steering committee," she notes. "To be proactive, the data protection steering committee is looking at incidents that have happened in the health care environment and asking: What if this happens to us? We modify process and policy as needed to assure readiness."<br><br><a href="http://www.canhealth.com/blog/response-to-ransomware-costs-hospital-10-million/" target="_blank" name="canhealth blog response to ransomware costs h">Response to ransomware costs hospital $10 million</a><br>Can Health Tech | August 9, 2017<br><br>BUFFALO, N.Y. – Hackers demanded $30,000 from the Erie County Medical Center during a massive cyber-attack in April, when ransomware shut down the hospital’s computers. The medical centre didn’t pay the fee, but it did spend $5 million on new hardware, software and services to recover its data and protect itself from future intrusions.<br><br>Another $5 million in costs stemmed from a combination of increased expenses, such as for staff overtime pay, and lower revenues from the loss of business during the system down time, the Buffalo News reported.<br><br>That’s just the costs related to the incident. Going forward, medical center officials also anticipate an ongoing additional expense of $250,000 to $400,000 a month for investments in upgraded technology and employee education to harden its computer system defenses to reduce the risk and impact of future attacks.<br></p><h3 class="phsa-rteElement-Header3">QUALITY IMPROVEMENT</h3><p class="phsa-rteElement-Paragraph"><br><a href="https://ehrintelligence.com/news/how-strong-health-data-governance-ensures-ehr-data-integrity" target="_blank" name="https ehrintelligence news how strong healt">How Strong Health Data Governance Ensures EHR Data Integrity</a><br>EHR Intelligence | August 7, 2017<br><br>Health data governance best practices are necessary for ensuring providers are getting the most out of their EHR systems. Maintaining the principles of data governance and implementing strategies to improve EHR data quality, use, and exchange can lead to better patient safety, health IT interoperability, and clinical efficiency.<br><br>The American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) continues to stress the <a href="http://www.ahima.org/topics/infogovernance/igbasics?tabid=overview" name="ahima org topics infogovernance igbasics tabi">importance of effective EHR data management</a> and appropriate changes to clinical processes and workflows in the wake of rapid rates of EHR adoption and the growing need for accurate, timely information for high-quality patient care.<br><br>“The complexity of technology and the associated process and workflow changes associated with it can result in unintended consequences,” it stated the association. “While IG recognizes the importance of technology, it realigns the focus from being solely on technology to the people and policies generate and manage data and information for safe, high quality care.”<br>Health data governance is also useful for supporting patient engagement strategies for healthcare organizations interested in allowing patients greater access to their own electronic health information.<br><br>“IG addresses the need for transparency, accuracy, and integrity of information shared with patients,” stated AHIMA. “This is absolutely essential for patients to have confidence in their providers and fully participate as members of their healthcare team.”<br><br>Well-established data governance best practices as well as new developments in data provenance and EHR use guidelines can assist providers in optimizing health IT for improved patient health outcomes.<br><br><strong>Data governance best practices</strong><br><br>To assist healthcare organizations in reaping the benefits of data governance, AHIMA developed the <a href="http://library.ahima.org/doc?oid=107468#.WYiYTojyuUk" name="library ahima org doc oid 107468 WYiYTojyuUk">Information Governance Principles for Healthcare (IGPHC) framework</a>.<br>The framework sets forth a foundation of best practices for healthcare IG programs guided by the following eight principles:<br><br>Accountability-Healthcare organizations should require a member of hospital leadership to oversee a health data governance and management program. Healthcare organizations should also adopt a set of policies and procedures so the program can be audited.<br></p><h3 class="phsa-rteElement-Header3">CLINICAL DOCUMENTATION</h3><p class="phsa-rteElement-Paragraph"><br><a href="http://www.fortherecordmag.com/archives/0817p14.shtml" target="_blank" name="fortherecordmag archives 0817p14 shtml">Make Documentation a Two-Way Street</a><br>For the Record | August 2017<br><br>While there are many ways patients are becoming more involved in their care, the idea of patients participating in the charting process is a relatively new strategy. Despite being a concept without a track record, patient participation in documentation has the potential to be a difference maker.<br><br>For Stephanie Drobny, MS-HSL, RN, CPHQ, regional senior manager for outpatient oncology and infusion at three hospitals in the Banner Health System, getting patients involved in the charting process has been an eye-opener. She started doing it on her own and then decided to present the idea to her unit. From there she expanded the effort during a master's project on communication as leaders.<br><br>Since then, Drobny has been on a crusade of sorts, sharing her experience and promoting the benefits of such an initiative. Feedback has been overwhelming, she says, noting that one physician told her that it's amazing something "so simple could be so profound."<br><br>"It's a new concept, but as we move health care forward we need to start addressing the relationship between nursing, providers, and patients," Drobny says. "We should not ultimately be the ones who manage patients' care—they need to learn to manage their own care. And what better way to start the process than to involve them during the charting? Part of the way we can empower patients to be more involved in their own care is to ensure they're getting all their health information presented to them in a way that they understand. Discussing this information while charting can be very effective."</p><p><br></p>http://www.himconnect.ca/blog/media-summary-august-212017-08-21T07:00:00Z
Media Summary Oct. 23Media Summary Oct. 23The HIM Media Summary is compiled by the HIM Communications' team on a bi-weekly basis. The stories featured in this email include topics related to Health Information Management. If you have a media story to share, please email us. <table cellspacing="0" width="100%" class="phsa-rteTable-default"><tbody><tr class="phsa-rteTableEvenRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default" style="width:767px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">HEALTH CARE NEWS & POLICY</h2></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableOddRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><p><a href="http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/teck-acute-care-centre-designed-to-distract-and-soothe-young-patients"><strong>Teck Acute Care Centre at Children's Hospital designed to distract and soothe young patients</strong></a></p><p>Vancouver Sun | Oct. 21<br></p><p> </p><p>"It's all about promoting healing and making children and their families feel confident and safe in this environment. We're trying to normalize the hospital environment, make it seem less institutionalized," she said during a tour of the new building.</p><p> </p><p>Parent and youth advisory boards gave plenty of advice on the design and features of the new building, including the selection of art and even the palettes of calming colours on walls and floors.</p><p> </p><p>All 231 patient rooms in the new Teck Acute Care Centre are private but in the event of admission surges, many rooms can be made into doubles to create extra capacity. Hospital leaders say the loss of current revenue from private room surcharges is expected to be about $1 million a year, a sum that will have to be found "through efficiencies elsewhere."</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2yy3KCp"><strong>Artificial Intelligence and the future of health care</strong></a></p><p>Fraser Health Beat | Oct. 10</p><p> </p><p>The idea of Artificial Intelligence (AI) raises images of science fiction movies from decades past, complete with struggles for world dominance. But AI is no longer fiction. In fact, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, states the future of Google is AI -- IBM, Microsoft and Apple have all made similar statements and are matching investments to pursue it.  </p><p> </p><p>What exactly is AI in health care? AI is the ability of a computer to recognize patterns in data and learn to better-solve problems - essentially AI is a computer that gets smarter over time.</p><p> </p><p>On November 8 and 9, Travis Oliphant, CEO of Anaconda shares his vision for AI in health care. Be sure to save your seat at the <a href="http://www.fraserhealth.ca/patientexperience2017">Patient Experience Conference</a> to learn more about these exciting innovations in health care.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2yEnTUL"><strong>Renowned North York MD shares lessons learned with Coastal provider</strong></a></p><p>VCH News | Oct. 10</p><p> </p><p>Award-winning health technology expert Dr. Jeremy Theal visited Coastal physicians and clinicians late last month to talk about the benefits of clinical information systems and share lessons learned from multiple implementations.</p><p> </p><p>For Dr. Theal, the key to success is taking the time to involve physicians and clinical leaders.</p><p> </p><p>As chief medical information officer and a staff gastroenterologist at Toronto's North York General Hospital (NYGH), Dr. Theal led the phased implementation of the eCare project, starting in 2007 and culminating with hospital-wide adoption of a Cerner shared clinical information system in 2015. NYGH is a community teaching hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto with about 124,000 emergency department visits annually and 426 beds.</p><p> </p><p>Click <a href="https://youtu.be/WHrbpcUHmAY">here</a> to watch the entire presentation.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.healthcareitnews.com/news/canadian-cerner-install-under-investigation-again-mishaps-go-deeper-tech"><strong>Canadian Cerner install under investigation again, but mishaps go deeper than the tech</strong></a></p><p>Healthcare IT News | Oct. 04</p><p> </p><p>British Columbia Health Minister Adrian Dix launched a second investigation into the Cerner electronic health record system of Island Health (Vancouver Island Health Authority) on Sept. 20 -- a result of a rollout that has caused severe turmoil between the health system and the providers who don't want to use it.</p><p> </p><p>The $174 million system was launched in March 2016 at the Nanaimo Regional General Hospital, Dufferin Place Residential Care Centre in Nanaimo and Oceanside Health Centre in Parksville.</p><p> </p><p>Not long after the rollout, British Columbia Provincial Patient Safety and Quality Officer Doug Cochrane launched an investigation into the EHR to address the many complaints from providers.</p><p> </p><p>What he found were critical functional deficiencies in the EHR: any user could inadvertently order unsafe medication doses, multiple orders of high-risk meds would remain active, the EHR extensively used small font sizes, drop-down menus had long lists that were tough to read, and the display was dense and difficult to read and navigate.</p><p> </p><p>Further, end users were reporting issues with system responsiveness, log-in problems when changing computers, unexplained screen freezes, connectivity problems with the barcode readers and the PharmaNet integration wasn't effective and added to the burden of medication reconciliation.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2yWK3oq"><strong>Ontario devises cloud-based triage system for EDs</strong></a></p><p>Can Health Tech News | Oct. 02</p><p> </p><p>Cancer Care Ontario is in the process of rolling out a cloud-based system for Emergency Department triage to hospitals across the province. The computerized system uses algorithms that lead to more consistent assessments of patients who present in Emergency Rooms, resulting in higher quality triage and ultimately, increased patient safety.</p><p> </p><p>"We're now live in six hospitals and by 2018, the system will be in 100 hospitals," said Steve Scott, Director of eCTAS, Analytics & Informatics at Cancer Care Ontario.</p><p> </p><p>Scott added that over 100,000 patients have been triaged using the system, so far. Called eCTAS, short for the Electronic Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale, the system also provides real-time reporting of patient loads in Emergency Departments.</p><p> </p><p>This data will be useful for the hospitals using the system, as well as planners in Local Health Information Networks (LHINs) and by the Ministry of Health.</p><p> </p><p>The eCTAS solution also shows ER nurses if the patient presenting has been at other emergency departments, and provides the record of triage, but not the diagnostic record.</p><p> </p><p>The rollout comes after an intensive period of design and testing. A key factor in the design was the involvement of nurses, who worked closely with technologists and designers.</p><p> </p><p>"We asked for nurses to volunteer [in the design stage] and expected eight to 10 to sign on," said Scott. "It turned out that we got 90 volunteers." Many nurses saw the creation of a shared eCTAS system as an important project and wanted to be involved, he said.</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2gy2OGZ"><strong>Alberta announces $459 million deal for Epic EMR</strong></a></p><p>Can Health Tech News | Oct. 04</p><p> </p><p>The Alberta Health Services board has approved a $459-million deal with U.S. technology giant Epic Systems to outfit the health authority with an advanced clinical information system.</p><p> </p><p>The agreement includes the installation of software that will form the new Connect Care network, along with ongoing support and staff training, the Edmonton Journal reported.</p><p> </p><p>"When you come to some of these large system implementations, there are really only a few vendors capable of doing something like this," AHS president and CEO Verna Yiu (pictured) said. "They (Epic) are very well-known, well-established and they have a lot of expertise around big system implementation."</p><p> </p><p>Epic's website says the company currently supports electronic medical records for 190 million patients.</p><p> </p><p>Yiu described Connect Care as a massive, "transformative" project that will provide a new, integrated information hub for all of AHS's clinical care areas, including hospitals, ambulatory clinics and continuing care centres. It is designed to consolidate some 1,300 information systems the health authority is currently using, many of which are badly outdated, unconnected and expensive to maintain.</p><p> </p><p>For patients, the initiative is touted to provide a single medical record that can be accessed at any point in the health system, including by patients themselves. Health professionals, who still use paper for some tasks, will move to more modern processes, while AHS administrators can use data in the platform to improve quality and safety.</p><p> </p><p>The NDP government has committed $400 million over five years for the project, though the entire initiative is expected to cost about $1.6 billion.</p><br></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableEvenRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">EHEALTH and DATA<br></h2></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableOddRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><p> </p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2yYy7T3"><strong>Health systems can operate like true systems for online patient access</strong></a></p><p>Digital Commerce 360 | Oct. 11</p><p> </p><p>Leading health systems across the U.S. are implementing a range of innovative programs to address the aforementioned challenges and achieve integrated patient access. These programs undoubtedly require substantial time, planning, and change management, and the factors impacting success will vary from system to system. However, some of the common characteristics of organizations succeeding in driving this systemness include having:</p><p> </p><ul><li>Strong "C-Level" digital champions who spearhead system-wide innovation with a commitment to presenting a unified digital community and delivering modern self-service capabilities to patients.</li><li>Patient access and experience leaders who advocate that strategies to present a "one system" image and consistent patient experience system-wide must encompass the variety of access points with which patients engage (call centers, websites, urgent care clinics, etc.).</li><li>Marketing leaders who recognize that effectively attracting and converting patient demand across the system starts with having aggregated, accurate information about who the system's providers are, what they do, and where they're located.</li><li>Effective and sustained provider engagement programs, including having at least one influential physician champion and program elements that involve engaging the provider community proactively in efforts to promote systemness, particularly when they involve new technologies.<br><br><strong> </strong><strong style="background-color:transparent;"> </strong></li></ul><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2xbU1xk"><strong>Is Canadian health care as great as we like to think?</strong></a></p><p>CTV News | Oct. 20<br></p><p>For many Canadians, our universal health care system is a source of national pride. But the head of a government-funded health care improvement organization says Canada's system barely ranks above that of the U.S. and lags far behind systems in Europe, where taxpayers get more care for their money.<br> <br></p><p>Maureen O'Neil is the president of the Canadian Foundation for Health Improvement, a not-for-profit organization funded by Health Canada to evaluate ways to improve our country's health system.</p><p><br>She notes that experts weighing in on a global "health care tournament" voted to eliminate Canada in the first round. The tournament rankings, published in The New York Times, found that, while the U.S. health system is "a bit of a mess," expensive and non-universal, that country excels in medical technology innovation, has few delays, and good outcomes for patients.</p><p> </p><p>Canada, on the other hand, was found to have profound "access problems," so that nearly one in five Canadian patients wait four months or more for elective surgery.</p><p> </p><p>Sharing her take on CTV"s Your Morning, O'Neil is not sure she can agree that the U.S. health system is better than the Canadian system.</p><p> </p><p>"We actually aren't inferior to the Americans," she said Friday. "In fact, if you look at all the comparisons that get made – by the Commonwealth Fund, by the OECD – Canada always does almost as badly as the U.S., but usually one or two (rankings) up."</p><p> </p><p>For example, a recent report by the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) using survey results compiled by the Commonwealth Fund found that Canadians experienced some of the longest delays to see specialists.</p><p><br></p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2yIUCIE"><strong>Digital Health for Canadians the Focus of Infoway Partnership Conference</strong></a></p><p>Longwoods.com | Oct. 20</p><p> </p><p>Digital health leaders from around the world are coming together with a common goal of advancing digital health at the annual <a href="http://bit.ly/2yK0LpD">Infoway Partnership Conference November 14 and 15</a>.  Participants will gather in Calgary to join this forum for knowledge exchange, debate and discussion.</p><p> </p><p>In the past, the conference emphasized modernizing the health care system by moving from paper to digital as the medium to record and exchange patient information.  Today, interoperable systems that securely store and may communicate data (lab test results, digital images, and medication history), among health care providers are widely in use.</p><p> </p><p>As more and more Canadians become digital health users, privacy and security remains a priority.</p><p> </p><p>Patients and caregivers play a crucial role in improving patient outcomes themselves, and they are at the centre of the next wave of digital health innovation in Canada.</p><p> </p><p>This year's Infoway Partnership Conference has been designed to align with the next wave of the digital health journey, with themes that include the ability for all Canadians to access and manage health records digitally, in addition to interoperability (the ability for systems to exchange information securely).</p><p> <br></p><p>"Participants at the 2017 Infoway Partnership Conference will have the chance to examine ongoing digitally-enabled advances to our health care system," said Lynne Zucker, Vice-President at Infoway.  "We expect a healthy amount of debate and discussion, a look at emerging digital health solutions that are transforming the health care experience for Canadians, and sessions with health care leaders providing unique perspectives on universal challenges such as security."<br></p><br><br></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableEvenRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">PRIVACY<br></h2></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableOddRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2l41WeD"><strong>Who can see what will be part of Health PEI privacy breach review</strong></a></p><p>CBC.ca | Oct. 20</p><p> </p><p>As part of its investigation into a privacy breach at Charlottetown's Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Health PEI will be looking at which health care providers can access which medical charts. On Wednesday Health PEI said it had discovered that an employee had, over the course of three years, been inappropriately reading the records of patients. Health PEI said a total of 353 files were accessed.</p><p> </p><p>The breach was discovered two weeks ago. Following a week-long investigation the woman was confronted with the evidence, and her employment was terminated.</p><p> </p><p>Acting Health PEI CEO Denise Lewis Fleming said the agency will conduct a review of what happened, and that review will include reconsidering who can see what in private health information files.</p><p> </p><p>"We will be reviewing our policies and processes, including the acceptable use of clinical charts policy and roles-based access," said Lewis Fleming, in a statement to CBC News.</p><p> </p><p>P.E.I.'s Health Information Act, which came into effect in July, specifies employees should not necessarily be able to access all of a patient's file.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2hT7R1x"><strong>New emailing policy for VCH/PHC staff and physicians</strong></a></p><p>VCH News | Sept. 6</p><p> </p><p>There's a new <a href="http://vch-connect/policies_manuals/business_affairs/privacyandFOI/Documents/emailing.pdf">Emailing Policy at VCH and PHC</a>, which is now in effect for all VCH and PHC staff and physicians. This replaces the previous policy, and allows the use of VCH or PHC email at work to communicate with clients, other staff and care providers and external parties.</p><p> </p><p><em>How does the new policy affect my work?</em></p><p>When emailing, ensure you're following these instructions:</p><p> </p><p><strong>Confirm recipient:</strong> confirm the identity of the person you are emailing with before sending any personal or confidential information through email e.g. by verifying the person's email address in person or over the phone, or asking the other person to send the initial email.</p><p><strong>Small amounts of personal information are acceptable:</strong> while following the emailing guidelines, small amounts of personal information about individuals can be sent using regular email to provide care or conduct other health authority business. "Small amounts" generally means information, including health records, pertaining to a particular individual per message. Where large amounts of personal information must be sent e.g. entire patient charts or lists of patient information pertaining to more than 10 individuals, files must be <a href="http://vch-connect/programs/lsipo/information_privacy_office/privacy_resources/Documents/staff_guidelines_doc/Encryption%20and%20Password%20Recommendations%2005Jan2016.pdf">encrypted</a>. For secure transmission of datasets for quality improvement, research or other secondary uses, contact the <a href="http://vch-connect/programs/lsipo/ourteam/Pages/default.aspx">VCH Data Release Management Office</a>.</p><p><strong>Retain client care records in chart:</strong> emails and attachments relating to client care that are of clinical significance must be retained and/or documented in the client's chart, and then deleted from the email account.</p><p><strong>Client notification:</strong> communicate to clients the common risks associated with emailing by forwarding them this link: vch.ca/emailtext.</p><br></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableEvenRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">INTEROPERABILITY</h2></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableOddRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2xUpQz7"><strong>Creating a Glide Path to Interoperability – HIMSS Releases a Call to Action</strong></a></p><p>HIMSS | Oct. 20</p><p> </p><p><em>Key themes grounded in current 'pain points'</em></p><p>The HIMSS I&HIE Committee worked with HIMSS staff on a concise list of themes to articulate tangible action items. An environmental scan of approaches to national interoperability, plus the committee's work on trusted exchange frameworks, informed these themes. HIMSS plans to publish the first version of this environmental scan later this year.</p><p> </p><p>Other themes originated from committee members' direct experience in the field as well as policy discussions in Washington D.C. We referred to these themes as current 'pain points' – what we deal with in our professional and personal lives on a daily basis. After a series of iterations, the committee confirmed six key areas that eventually led to the presentation of the following call to action:</p><p> </p><p>1. Demand Integration between the Interoperability Approaches and Trusted Exchange Frameworks for the Public Good;</p><p> </p><p>2. Educate the Community to Appropriately Implement Existing and Emerging Standards, Data Formats, and Use Cases to Ensure a Comprehensive, Integrated Approach to Care;</p><p> </p><p>3. Ensure Stakeholder Participation from across the care continuum, including patients and caregivers;</p><p> </p><p>4. Identify the "minimum necessary" business rules for Trusted Exchange to enhance care coordination;</p><p> </p><p>5. Standardize and adopt identify management approaches; and</p><p> </p><p>6. Improve usability for data use to support direct care and research. </p><p> </p><p>These six guiding principles build on the calls to action included in the <a href="https://www.healthit.gov/sites/default/files/hie-interoperability/nationwide-interoperability-roadmap-final-version-1.0.pdf">Shared Nationwide Interoperability Roadmap</a>.</p><br></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableEvenRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">CLINICAL DOCUMENTATION</h2></td></tr><tr class="phsa-rteTableOddRow-default"><td class="phsa-rteTableEvenCol-default"><p><strong> </strong></p><p><a href="http://bit.ly/2zoYXQm"><strong>Preventing Stress, Avoiding Burnout (Coders)</strong></a></p><p>For the Record Magazine | Oct. 2017</p><p> </p><p>While there are plenty of avenues for problems to emerge in the workplace, there are also viable solutions to counteract the potential for disarray. One key is to make coders feel heard, valued, and empowered. "The HIM/coding manager needs to be responsible for listening to the needs of the team members and taking action on those needs," Cranford says, adding that this is particularly important during times of change, a common condition in the HIM/coding universe.</p><p> </p><p>"The manager can be a positive change agent by promoting the advantages of the changes and assisting team members in understanding the reasons for the changes, communicating frequently and transparently, involving team members in planning and projects, and assisting team members in professional growth," she says. "While this is more challenging in a remote environment, it can and must be done for the betterment of the team and the organization. The leader must reassure team members about changes he or she knows are not happening—such as a common fear of outsourcing—but must be completely honest and transparent with whatever information can be shared."</p><p> </p><p>Maxfield agrees that transparency is key, noting that "dialogue is the antidote to drama." He says that when people speak up about their concerns in a way that is frank, honest, and respectful, then disagreements can be contained before they develop into full-blown drama.</p><p> </p><p>"Managers can help by making it safe to talk about mistakes, errors, and misunderstandings," Maxfield says. "These are normal parts of being human and working with other humans. Managers can also encourage team members to discuss their concerns with each other instead of behind each other's backs. Often, team members need some coaching or even training on how to talk to a colleague about these kinds of concerns, and managers can help here as well."</p><p> </p><p>Moffic says managers can take steps to help prevent a competitive environment, including encouraging peers to support one another, a key to employee success and department harmony. He says a workplace where everyone feels as though they are competing for a promotion does more harm than good and should be avoided.</p><p> </p><p>To curtail the feeling that employees are constantly being monitored, Moffic suggests coders be involved in the review process. While he personally is not a fan of outside consultants—he believes it's better for someone internal to perform the audits—should that be the only option, managers and executives can make coders feel a part of the process by involving them in the hiring. Be transparent about who is being brought in to conduct reviews and value the opinions of coding staff members. These efforts can help eliminate workplace stress and drama.</p><p> </p><p>"Making coders part of that process gives them some responsibility and, in turn, empowers them," Moffic says. "This is a lot more effective than causing them to feel watched over or devalued by keeping them totally out of the loop."</p><p><br><a href="https://klasresearch.com/resources/blogs/2017/10/19/providers-are-buying-partnerships-not-products"><strong>Providers Are Buying Partnerships, Not Products</strong></a></p><p>KLAS Research | Oct. 13 2017</p><p> </p><p>As software becomes more complex and is implemented in large organizations, there is a greater need for help from the vendor community to ensure customers are successful with the software. As I reflected on the meaning behind what Rasu shared, I started to think about what providers are buying in a partnership. </p><p> </p><p>They are buying an IT team, a support team, an implementation and training team, a team of developers that understand healthcare, and an executive team that knows the direction healthcare is going in and can create a strategy that aligns technology with the ever-changing needs of providers. This sounds like more than just software.</p><p> </p><p> In a separate session, Louis Lannum, former imaging director at Cleveland Clinic and current executive at Agfa HealthCare, said, "We need to stop selling technology to providers; we need to sell customer success. We need to sell how we are going to help them achieve their needed outcomes."  This customer-success sentiment was followed up with a thought from Tarik Alkasab from Massachusetts General Hospital, who said, "We are not buying technology from a vendor. We are marrying them [the vendor]."</p><p> </p><p> The imagery of marriage suggest that this is a much larger commitment than just buying software. In summary, it sounds like to me that providers are marrying technology partners that are focused on customer success and driving outcomes.</p><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table><p><br></p>http://www.himconnect.ca/blog/media-summary-oct-232017-10-23T07:00:00Z
Media Summary April 2017Media Summary April 2017The HIM Media Summary is compiled by the HIM Communications’ team on a bi-weekly basis. The stories featured in this articles include topics related to Health Information Management. <blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 40px;border:none;padding:0px;"><table class="ec_repeat" width="95%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top" align="center"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 40px;border:none;padding:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">HEALTH CARE POLICY</h2></blockquote></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoa-5kprw3j1/" target="_blank" name="https infoway inforoute ca en what we do ne" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Federal Government Announces New Funding for Canada Health Infoway</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnob-5kprw3j2/" name="theglobeandmail news british columbia bc sign" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Infoway | March 23, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">The federal government has confirmed its commitment to improve the health of Canadians through digital health innovation by announcing a $300 million investment in Canada Health Infoway in Budget 2017, said Michael Green, Infoway’s President and CEO.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">“We appreciate the government’s continued support and confidence in Infoway and the transformative power of digital health innovation,” Green said. “This funding will enable us to continue our commitment to deliver better quality and access to care for all Canadians.”</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">The new funding will enable Infoway to continue to move forward with initiatives to help transform the health care system by “expanding e-prescribing and virtual care initiatives, supporting the continued adoption and use of electronic medical records, helping patients to access their own health records electronically, and better linking electronic health record systems to improve access by all providers and institutions."</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoc-5kprw3j3/" target="_blank" name="bccare ca 2017 03 opinion transferring health" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Opinion: Transferring health funding to the community will improve seniors care in British Columbia</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnod-5kprw3j4/" name="vancouversun news politics b c liberals promi" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Vancouver Sun | March 16, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">In British Columbia approximately thirteen percent of hospital beds are filled with patients who are ready to be discharged but for whom there is no appropriate place to go.<a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoe-5kprw3j5/" name="_ednref2" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;">[ii]</a> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">These patients, known as Alternate Level of Care (ALC) patients, spend on average 182 days in care limbo, according to one pan-Canada study.<a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnof-5kprw3j6/" name="_ednref3" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;">[iii]</a> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">British Columbia’s health authorities report that about half of ALC patients are awaiting discharge into long-term care<a name="_ednref3" style="color:#008080;"></a>.<a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnog-5kprw3j7/" name="_ednref4" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;">[iv]</a></p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr dir="ltr"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr></tr><tr></tr><tr></tr><tr dir="ltr"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoh-5kprw3j8/" name="timescolonist opinion columnists comment pape" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Comment: Why doctors back IHealth, yet have concerns</strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Times Colonist | March 14, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">We take strong exception to Dr. Dallen’s accusation that Nanaimo doctors are unengaged or obstructive. Many physicians at NRGH have volunteered thousands of hours before and after the rollout of IHealth to help address problems. That commitment is the major reason physicians have waited 11 months since the implementation of IHealth to demand its suspension.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">We are struck that those who have never actually used the system continue to disparage the medical staff in Nanaimo. We want to assure the public that our doctors remain extremely engaged and are eager to work with our administrative colleagues and computer company to fix the system.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">PRIVACY</h2></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><strong><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoi-5kprw3j9/" target="_blank" name="canhealth blog cheo employee shared 283 patie" style="color:#008080;">CHEO employee shared 283 patient records with students</a></strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoj-5kprw3j0/" name="vancouverisland ctvnews ca it s very disconce" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Can Health Tech | March 22, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">A part-time instructor at Algonquin College, who was also an employee of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), shared the private information of 283 patients with students. The breach of privacy prompted the person’s dismissal from the college and launched a privacy investigation at the hospital.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">The Ottawa Citizen newspaper reported that on March 10, Adam Vaughan received a letter in the mail about his seven-year-old daughter, who had been at the children’s hospital for a procedure earlier this year. The letter informed him that his daughter’s private information had been shared with Algonquin students by their instructor, also a CHEO employee.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnok-5kprw3j1/" target="_blank" name="canhealth technology for doctors hefty 25000 " style="color:#008080;"><strong>Hefty $25,000 fine levied in medical privacy breach</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnol-5kprw3j2/" name="vancouverisland ctvnews ca it s very disconce 2" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Technology for Doctors | March 29, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">An Ontario student has been fined $25,000 for accessing personal health information, which provincial officials say is the highest penalty of its kind ever in Canada. The Information and Privacy Commissioner’s office says the masters of social work student was on an educational placement with a family health team in Central Huron when she accessed the information without authorization.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnom-5kprw3j3/" target="_blank" name="globalnews ca news 3328360 former ahs supervi" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Former AHS supervisor convicted of ‘inappropriately’ accessing health information</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnon-5kprw3j4/" name="cbc ca news canada british columbia bc pharma" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoo-5kprw3j5/" name="vancouverisland ctvnews ca it s very disconce 3" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Global TV | March 22, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">A former supervisor of health information management with Alberta Health Services was slapped with a $5,000 fine on Tuesday after being convicted of 13 counts of accessing health information in contravention of the Health Information Act.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">According to the Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner (OIPC), AHS was notified of a potential “contravention of internal policy” at the Tofield Health Centre in June 2013. The privacy commissioner’s office said an AHS audit revealed Amanda Tripp had “visited with her boyfriend” in the facility’s health records room. In August 2013, AHS self-reported a privacy breach, alleging Tripp “inappropriately accessed patient records.”</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">PATIENT PORTALS</h2></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnop-5kprw3j6/" target="_blank" name="canhealth technology for doctors victoria hos" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Victoria hospital joins Telus social media platform</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoq-5kprw3j7/" target="_blank" name="hospitalnews new online medical record portal" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnor-5kprw3j8/" name="infotel ca newsitem myhealthportal coming to " target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Technology for Doctors | March 29, 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Victoria General Hospital has become the first hospital on Vancouver Island to join Upopolis, an innovative social support platform and networking tool giving young patients safe and secure access to kid-friendly medical content. Upopolis also provides kids with a vital link to their families, friends and schools while in hospital. “We are pleased to support initiatives that help young patients feel empowered while in our care,” said Health Minister Terry Lake (pictured).</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnos-5kprw3j9/" target="_blank" name="hospitalnews new online medical record portal 2" style="color:#008080;"><strong>New online medical record portal for patients: myHealthRecord</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnot-5kprw3j0/" name="infotel ca newsitem myhealthportal coming to 2" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Hospital News| March 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">WCH patients who register for myHealthRecord have convenient, online access to their health information securely stored in the hospital’s electronic patient record, including test results, medical history and personal health summaries. Patients can also manage their appointments, complete some pre-appointment questionnaires and securely communicate with members of their care team – all online, at their convenience.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnou-5kprw3j1/" name="infotel ca newsitem myhealthportal coming to 3" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Use and Maturity of Electronic Patient Portals</strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">IOS Press | March 2017</p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">This study examined data from a number of patient portal demonstration projects deployed throughout various Canadian jurisdictions between 2011 and 2015. These projects reported on the number of users accessing their respective portals for the first nine to 19 months since their inception in order to compare their relative adoption rates.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><strong><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnov-5kprw3j2/" target="_blank" name="https infoway inforoute ca en component edo" style="color:#008080;">INFOWAY-Positive Patient Experience Yields Health Care Benefits</a><a href="https://www.cmpa-acpm.ca/-/patient-portals-a-new-communication-tool-for-doctors-and-patients" name="https cmpa acpm ca patient portals a new " target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"></a></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">INFOWAY | March 9, 2017</td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Infoway’s Consumer Health Solutions investment program was established to educate and empower Canadians by providing electronic access to their health information and health care services.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">A 2016 report Connecting Patients for Better Health, indicates the growth in the availability of consumer digital health services has more than doubled in two years.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Canadians want and are using a variety of online e-patient services; namely: e-booking of appointments; e-visits with care providers; electronic requests for refilling medications; e-views of health information; and telehomecare. Infoway has co-invested with the provinces and territories and other partners in more than 400 digital health projects, including consumer health solution projects.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><strong>British Columbia Direct Patient Access to Laboratory Results</strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">This evaluation focused on a provincial portal in BC that provides patients with direct online access to their laboratory test results. The findings include improved patient satisfaction, more timely access to results, no increase in anxiety when first learning results online, and fewer calls to physician offices. The study involved a survey of BC residents who have accessed their lab results online and a comparison group who accessed their most recent lab result in-person.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Project Highlights:</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><ul><li>81 per cent of felt they knew what questions to ask their doctor at their next scheduled appointment</li><li>95 per cent felt more confident taking care of their health</li><li>94 per cent felt having online access to lab results improved their knowledge of their health</li><li>93 per cent felt they could have more informed discussions with their doctor</li><li>BC patients who accessed their laboratory results online (e-view) were significantly less likely to have an in-person visit after learning their results online compared to patients who received their results in-person from their doctor/regular place of care (41 per cent vs. 25 per cent).</li></ul></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">CODING AND INFORMATICS</h2></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnow-5kprw3j3/" name="https cihi ca en submit data and view stand" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Industry Perspectives: Documenting Death</strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">For the Record | February 2017</td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">What are the odds that your next-door neighbor is coming home from the hospital after a bout of pneumonia? It depends. Is it the 22-year-old with asthma or the 86-year-old grandfather in septic shock with comorbidities of congestive heart failure, metastatic lung cancer on home oxygen, and dehydration?</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Intuitively, you know there is a higher likelihood that grandpa will die, but statistics also bear that out. That is what risk modeling does, and that is how risk-adjusted mortality rates work.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Although mortality is one of the easiest metrics to understand, all risk adjustment works the same. The basic principle is observed over expected—that is, what happened divided by how likely was it to have happened in this type of patient with his or her specific constellation of demographics, diagnoses, conditions, and procedures.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">CLINICAL DOCUMENTATION</h2></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnox-5kprw3j4/" name="ucalgary ca utoday issue 2017 03 24 grad stud" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Grad student uses technology to open doors for learning and health care innovation</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoy-5kprw3j5/" name="marketwired press release mmodal launches uni" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">UCalgary | March 24, 2017</td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">After graduating, he was back at The Alex as a registered nurse and assistant manager and is now with Alberta Health Services in rural outreach. He has returned to the <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnoz-5kprw3j6/" name="https nursing ucalgary ca 2017stratplan" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;">Faculty of Nursing</a> as a graduate student and member of the <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp0-5kprw3j3/" name="nursing ucalgary ca cslc" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;">Clinical Simulation Learning Centre</a>’s (CSLC) research team. And he is on screen again, this time in the faculty’s strategic plan video.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><strong>Technology vital in health-care education and nursing research</strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">“Technology is central to my practice — not just because I’m technically a Millennial, but because it plays a vital role in my daily work,” says Sekhon. He adds that his introduction to simulation in his undergraduate education inspired his interest and use of technology in health care. </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">“That integration of technology enhanced the quality of my learning and really sparked a passion in me to discover more ways to look at technology in health-care education and research,” he says. “The research we are involved in on the CSLC team is all about technology as well.”</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp1-5kprw3j4/" target="_blank" name="hospitalnews majority canadas clinicians usin" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Majority of Canada’s clinicians using electronic health records</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp2-5kprw3j5/" name="healthdatamanagement news online tool helps p" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Hospital News | March 2017</td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">According to the article <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp3-5kprw3j6/" target="_blank" name="bmcmedinformdecismak biomedcentral articles 1" style="color:#008080;"><em>Measuring interoperable EHR adoption and maturity: a Canadian example</em></a>, 91,235 health care professionals in Canada were active users of at least two iEHR components (e.g., access to diagnostic tests and drug information outside of their organization) as of March 31, 2015. </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Twelve months later, that figure jumped by an additional 50 per cent, bringing the number to approximately 139,000.  More than 250,000 clinicians from across Canada use at least one component of the iEHR.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Bobby Gheorghiu, Infoway’s Manager of Trending and Performance, who authored the article, says the increased use is expected to continue to rise.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">“As more and more health care professionals use Electronic Health Record systems to access patient information from other institutions, the country moves closer to digital becoming the standard of practice,” he said.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><img src="http://media.campaigner.com/media/58/581825/Media%20Summary/Infoway.jpg" alt="" style="margin:5px;width:591px;" /> </p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">Health Care News</h2></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp4-5kprw3j7/" target="_blank" name="theglobeandmail news national most canadians " style="color:#008080;"><strong>Most Canadians get timely medical treatment: report</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp5-5kprw3j8/" name="theglobeandmail report on business small busi" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Globe and Mail | March 28, 2017</td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p class="selectionShareable" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">The report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) looked at whether patients were receiving treatment within a time frame deemed medically acceptable for procedures including hip replacement, hip-fracture repair, knee replacement, cataract surgery and radiation therapy. It also tabulated wait times for cancer surgeries, MRI and CT scans.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" dir="ltr" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp6-5kprw3j9/" target="_blank" name="globalnews ca news 3323453 watch video of pat" style="color:#008080;"><strong>WATCH: Video of patients in Surrey ER hallways raises concerns</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp7-5kprw3j0/" target="_blank" name="theglobeandmail news national most canadians 2" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp8-5kprw3j1/" name="theglobeandmail report on business small busi 2" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Global TV | March 21, 2017</td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p class="selectionShareable" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">New video is surfacing showing the extent of hallway medicine in Fraser Health Authority hospitals. John Hua has more on the mounting cases of questionable medical care.</p></td></tr><tr></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr dir="ltr"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnp9-5kprw3j2/" target="_blank" name="canhealth blog innovative nygh scoops up e he" style="color:#008080;"><strong>Innovative NYGH scoops up e-health award of excellence at HIMSS</strong></a></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpa-5kprw3j2/" target="_blank" name="canhealth blog innovative nygh scoops up e he 2" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpb-5kprw3j3/" name="theglobeandmail report on business small busi 3" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr"><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Can Health Tech | March 30, 2017</td></tr><tr dir="ltr"><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">In February, leaders of North York General Hospital formally accepted a Nicholas E. Davies Award of Excellence from HIMSS – the first-ever for a Canadian acute-care hospital. Only 50 other hospitals around the world have won a Davies Award, which is given to organizations that have substantially improved patient outcomes using computerized healthcare systems.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">NYGH was recognized for its multi-faceted eCare program – which among other achievements, has prevented an estimated 11,000 medication errors.</p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr dir="ltr"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><strong><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpc-5kprw3j4/" target="_blank" name="fortherecordmag archives 0317p5 shtml" style="color:#008080;"><strong>HIM Involvement Essential to Effective Information Governance</strong></a><a href="http://www.canhealth.com/blog/innovative-nygh-scoops-up-e-health-award-of-excellence-at-himss/" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"></a></strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpd-5kprw3j5/" name="theglobeandmail report on business small busi 4" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr"><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">For the Record | March 2017</td></tr><tr dir="ltr"><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">When developing an IG program, HIM leaders may apply a Six Sigma approach to ensure no assumptions are made when learning about the workflows of the various departments and facilities that access and disclose data. This allows for a full vetting of issues and the mapping of information to develop an action plan and improvement activities. HIM also can recommend best practices, such as partnering with a skilled and knowledgeable PHI disclosure management company that has proven expertise in understanding IG principles and can integrate with the hospital's electronic source systems. Such a partner is often engaged in the discussion and definition of the source of truth for information, an essential concept to master in IG development. Also, as a partner that manages PHI on behalf of the covered entity utilizing advanced technologies, the vendor can provide feedback regarding data quality so that appropriate mitigation efforts are taken to resolve issues and/or processes.</p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr dir="ltr"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><strong><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpe-5kprw3j6/" target="_blank" name="hospitalnews working together get best health" style="color:#008080;">Working together to get the best health technologies into our health system</a></strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpf-5kprw3j7/" name="theglobeandmail report on business small busi 5" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr"><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Hospital News | March 2017</td></tr><tr dir="ltr"><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">What if industry and key members of the health system worked together to identify areas of need and worked towards advancing and adopting technologies to address those needs? The health system would have a much better chance of adopting the right technologies and using them to best assist patients.</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">Alberta Innovates – Health Solutions (AIHS), Alberta Health Services (AHS), the Institute for Health Economics (IHE) and MEDEC have been working together to do just that. This unique collaboration brings together the health system, government, and industry leaders to address the emerging needs of patients in Alberta. This partnership allows the actual needs of Albertans to determine when and how health technologies are adopted into the system.</p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr"></tr></tbody></table><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;"><h2 class="phsa-rteElement-Header2">Health Information Management News</h2></td></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="background-color:transparent;font-size:20px;"></tr></tbody></table></blockquote><blockquote style="margin:0px 0px 0px 40px;border:none;padding:0px;"><table class="ec_repeat" width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" data-block-group="main_column" style="color:#000000;font-family:arial, verdana, geneva, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:12px;background-color:#ffffff;"><tbody><tr dir="ltr" style="text-align:left;"><td valign="top"></td></tr><tr><td class="ec_item titleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="31" style="margin:0px;color:#008b8b;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;"><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;text-align:left;"> <strong>HIM in the news</strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"></p><p dir="ltr" style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;text-align:left;"> <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpg-5kprw3j8/" name="theglobeandmail report on business small busi 6" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong></strong></a></p></td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="text-align:left;"><td class="ec_item SubtitleContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" height="29" style="margin:0px;color:#a9a9a9;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:14px;">Various | March 2017</td></tr><tr dir="ltr" style="text-align:left;"><td class="ec_item textContent ecaction_edit" valign="top" style="color:#3c3c3c;font-family:verdana, arial, helvetica, sans-serif;"><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;">The following stories were published about HIM and Health Information Professional's Week:</p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <strong>VCH News</strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnph-5kprw3j9/" target="_blank" name="vchnews ca across vch 2017 03 23 new website " style="color:#008080;"><strong>New website for health records & clinical documentation</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <a href="https://secure.campaigner.com/csb/Public/show/HIP%20Week%20celebrations%20showcase%20professional%20growth" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;"><strong>HIP Week celebrations showcase professional growth</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <strong>PHC News</strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpi-5kprw3j0/" target="_blank" name="phcnews ca news hip week celebrations showcas" style="color:#008080;"><strong>HIP Week Celebrations Showcases Profession’s Growth</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpj-5kprw3j1/" target="_blank" name="phcnews ca news celebrating hip week and new " style="color:#008080;"><strong>Celebrating HIP week and a new HIM website: www.himconnect.ca</strong></a></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <strong>FH Beat</strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> </p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"> <strong style="color:#008080;"><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpk-5kprw3j2/" target="_blank" style="color:#008080;">New Health Information Management website for patients and health care professionals: himconnect.ca</a><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpk-5kprw3j2/" target="_blank" name="thebeat fraserhealth ca news march 2017 new h"></a><a href="http://trk.cp20.com/click/fjxpg-afjnpk-5kprw3j2/" target="_blank"></a></strong></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><br></p><p style="margin-top:1em;margin-bottom:1em;"><img src="/blog-site/PublishingImages/blog/media-summary-april-2017/Health-Authority-Partner-Logo-Banner-large.png" alt="Health-Authority-Partner-Logo-Banner-large.png" style="margin:5px;" /><br></p></td></tr></tbody></table></blockquote>http://www.himconnect.ca/blog/media-summary-april-20172017-04-03T07:00:00Z

 
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